Regional Campus eTours

Welcome to Daytona Beach

Listen as four Daytona Beach students discuss their third and fourth years of medical school and tell stories about their most memorable patients – including their first chance to deliver a baby. (3m:37s)

Meet Dean Luckey Dunn, M.D.

The Daytona Beach dean, Dr. Luckey Dunn, has a great story about how students keep their physician/faculty members on their toes. (4m:19s)

Daytona Beach Student Experiences

Listen as four Daytona Beach students discuss their third- and fourth-years of medical school and tell stories about their most memorable patients – including their first chance to deliver a baby. (3m:12s)

On Campus and On Call in Daytona Beach

Students describe a typical day in their clinical years at the Daytona Beach Regional Campus. “It’s just a lot of fun,” one student says, “to be involved in patient care.” (2m:56s)

Daytona Beach After Hours

The famous beach, the International Speedway, skydiving, canoeing, golf – the Daytona Beach area has a wide array of attractions. Hear what Daytona Beach students choose to do when they hang their white coat up for the day. (1m:49s)

Welcome to Fort Pierce

Get an overview of the Fort Pierce Regional Campus, one of six in the state, where our students experience hands-on clinical training in the Treasure Coast area. (4m:39s)

Meet Dean Juliette Lomax-Homier M.D.

Dr. Lomax-Homier is responsible for overseeing the clinical education for third- and fourth-year medical students at the FSU College of Medicine's regional campus in Fort Pierce. She works closely with the clerkship directors, the Treasure Coast medical community, and faculty and staff to ensure the quality of the clinical education. (3m:49s)

Fort Pierce Student Experiences

Listen as four Fort Pierce students discuss their third and fourth years of medical school and tell stories about their most memorable patients – including an experience that surgical residents would be jealous of. (4m:03s)

On Campus and On Call in Fort Pierce

Students describe a typical day in their clinical years at the Fort Pierce Regional Campus, detailing their daily routines in a hospital or clinic setting with their physician faculty. (3m:29s)

Fort Pierce After Hours

Learn about Fort Pierce and the surrounding Treasure Coast area, where there are plenty of things to do both outdoors and indoors. (2m:35s)

Welcome to Orlando

Get an overview of the Orlando Regional Campus, one of six in the state, where our students experience hands-on clinical training in the Orlando and Central Florida areas. (4m:21s)

Meet Dean Michael Muszynski, M.D., FAAP

The Orlando dean, Dr. Michael Muszynski, talks about the faculty physicians in the area who teach our students along with the big-city experience that students can expect. (3m:43s)

Orlando Student Experiences

Listen as Orlando students discuss their third and fourth years of medical school and tell stories about their most memorable patients – including a life-changing experience in the neonatal ICU. (3m:40s)

On Campus and On Call in Orlando

Students describe a typical day in their clinical years at the Orlando Regional Campus, detailing their daily routines in a hospital or clinic setting with their physician faculty. (4m:25s)

Orlando After Hours

Learn about the city of Orlando and the surrounding Central Florida area, where there are plenty of things to do in the traditional tourist areas as well as the rest of the community. (2m:15s)

Welcome to Pensacola

Get an overview of the Pensacola Regional Campus, one of six in the state. Our students experience hands-on clinical training in Pensacola and the surrounding Florida Panhandle area. (4m:50s)

Meet Dean Paul McLeod, M.D.

The Pensacola Regional Campus dean talks about the physician faculty members in the area who teach our students, along with the patients in these communities who look forward to seeing them. (4m:46s)

Pensacola Student Experiences

Listen as Pensacola students discuss their third and fourth years of medical school and tell stories about their most memorable patients – including a touching account of a pediatric patient. (3m:04s)

On Campus and On Call in Pensacola

Students describe a typical day in their clinical years at the Pensacola Regional Campus, detailing their routines in a hospital or clinic setting with their physician faculty. (3m:29s)

Pensacola After Hours

Learn about the city of Pensacola and the Florida Panhandle area, where there are plenty of things to do at the beach as well as in the city. (2m:24s)

Welcome to Sarasota

Get an overview of the Sarasota Regional Campus, one of six in the state. Our students experience hands-on clinical training in Sarasota and the surrounding Southwest Florida counties. (4m:12s)

Meet Dean Bruce Berg, M.D., MBA

The Sarasota Regional Campus dean talks about the physician faculty members in the area who teach our students, along with the patients in these communities who look forward to seeing them. (3m:51s)

Sarasota Student Experiences

Listen as Sarasota students discuss their third and fourth years of medical school and tell stories about their most memorable patients – including a thrilling emergency surgery. (2m:56s)

On Campus and On Call in Sarasota

Students describe a typical day in their clinical years at the Sarasota Regional Campus, detailing their routines in a hospital or clinic setting with their physician faculty. (3m:45s)

Sarasota After Hours

Learn about the city of Sarasota and the outlying Southwest Florida area, where there are plenty of things to do at the beach as well as in the city. (2m:12s)

Welcome to Tallahassee

At any given time, about 40 students are spending their third and fourth years of medical school at the Tallahassee Regional Campus. They learn from the faculty of more than 450 community physicians in an apprentice-type relationship. (4m:32s)

Tallahassee Student Experiences

Hands-on experience is what separates FSU’s medical school from many others. In this video, you’ll hear one student marvel at the fact that, on her OB-GYN rotation, she got to deliver at least 20 babies. (3m:56s)

On Campus and On Call in Tallahassee

The physician faculty members are the key to our students’ medical education. Students don’t have to compete with residents, so they have virtually unlimited access to the attending physicians. Find out what a typical day on rotations is like. (3m:57s)

Tallahassee After Hours

Maclay Gardens, Wakulla Springs State Park, running trails, unique restaurants, cultural events and Florida State football are just a few of the attractions that Tallahassee offers. (3m:10s)

Marianna Rural Program

Students may choose to spend their entire third year in the rural community of Marianna, an hour and a half west of Tallahassee. Students say that both the physicians and patients provide a warm welcome and unlimited opportunities to learn. (4m:18s)

Thomasville Program

About 45 miles north of Tallahassee, Thomasville, Ga., is a small town with a large hospital that serves numerous communities. Like the people of Marianna, the people of Thomasville go out of their way to give students an unbeatable medical experience. (3m:2s)

In 2007, the College of Medicine partnered with Collier Health Services (now Healthcare Network of Southwest Florida) to provide health care for Immokalee’s rural and underserved population. Students have multiple options to complete portions of their medical education program in Immokalee.


Quick Overview

Students get the same experiences in Immokalee as at the other campuses but also get the extras that come with a recent immigrant population. They get to practice interdisciplinary care and serve the underserved full time. The mission of FSU’s College of Medicine comes to life here. (1m:20s)

Who the Patients Are

They’re part of a migrant agricultural community from all over the world. Some families have been in Immokalee for generations; others just arrived. Most are Latino patients, but some also are Creole-speaking patients from Haiti. (1m:13s)

What Challenges They Face

For this community, the work is difficult, the pay is low, the jobs are intermittent because of weather and other factors, the language and cultural barriers are significant. For all of those reasons and others, stress is a constant companion, and that stress takes a physical and emotional toll. (3m:20s)

How the Clinic Serves Them

The clinic can handle patients’ needs related to pediatrics, women’s health, family medicine and internal medicine. Patients can see both a psychologist and a physician. If they can’t come to the clinic, somebody will visit their home. The physicians and staff understand what culturally appropriate care is. (3m:41s)

What Students Gain from Immokalee

Because migrant workers are rarely able to seek medical care, the pathologies that students do encounter are often complex. Students have an opportunity to learn firsthand from patients with a different cultural background. These patients are “the underserved” from the College of Medicine’s mission statement, waiting to be served – and they’re right here in Florida. (5m:42s)