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Development, Equity, and Resilience (DEaR) Lab


Our world is becoming increasingly diverse. We hope people can enjoy equal opportunities and good life outcomes regardless of their background (e.g., race, socioeconomic status). However, we still have a long way to go. People from various underrepresented populations tended to experience more developmental challenges. To promote equity across groups, people from multiple disciplines must work together. We offer our contributions by studying how environmental and biological factors influence individual health and development in underrepresented groups, including ethnic minorities, low SES families, and families with genetic disorders. We hope to identify mechanisms that can promote resilience in these underrepresented groups. Our ultimate goal is to inform the development of evidence-based intervention programs personalized to these marginalized groups to promote their mental health and to advocate patient-centered care, thereby reducing health disparities.

Our research utilizes various advanced quantitative methodologies such as structural equation modeling, time-varying effect modeling, multilevel modeling, latent profile analysis, meta-analysis, and integrative data analysis. Dr. Hou is enthusiastic about advancing developmental and clinical science by applying advanced quantitative methods and promoting open science practices, data sharing, and integrative data analysis.

Lab Members


Yang Hou, Ph.D.

Dr. Yang Hou, Principal Investigator, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Behavioral Sciences and Social Medicine in the College of Medicine at the Florida State University. Broadly, her research centers on how environmental and biological factors influence the neurobehavioral (cognitive, academic, socioemotional, behavioral) development of individuals in underrepresented groups such as ethnic minorities and families with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Her current primary line of research aims to use innovative and advanced quantitative methods to provide a more comprehensive understanding of the patterns and predictors of neurobehavioral development of individuals with NF across the lifespan. Ultimately, she plans to develop interventions to improve the neurobehavioral function of individuals with NF1. She is also enthusiastic about stimulating collaborative efforts and open science practice to accelerate intellectual discovery in the NF field. She has published over 30 peer-reviewed papers in top-tiered journals such as American PsychologistChild Development, and Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology. Her research has been funded by the USA Department of Defense and garnered multiple international awards, for example, Rising Star from Association for Psychological Science and Early Career Outstanding Paper Award from American Psychological Association.

Dr. Hou serves as a member of the editorial boards of Developmental Psychology, Journal of Youth and Adolescence, Cultural Diversity & Ethnic Minority Psychology, and Frontiers in Psychiatry. She also has served as an Ad Hoc Reviewer for many journals such as American Psychologist, Child DevelopmentJournal of Research on Adolescence, and Journal of Happiness Studies.

Email address: yang.hou@med.fsu.eduFaculty Profile;  ResearchGateGoogle Scholar; CV

 

Postdoctoral Scholars

 

Dan Lab Photo

Dr. Dan Liu is a postdoctoral scholar in the Department of Behavioral Sciences and Social Medicine in the College of Medicine at Florida State University. She completed her doctoral training at the Family Sciences Department, University of Kentucky (2016-2022). Her research focuses on the importance of factors including family processes (e.g., parenting, parent-child relationship, maternal vs. paternal parenting), self-control, and sleep in adolescent mental health (e.g., depression, anxiety) and problem behaviors (e.g., deviance, externalizing problems, bullying), patterns of the associations, as well as the underlying mechanisms. Her recent research focuses on socioemotional development in children with Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1).

Dr. Liu is proficient at data analytical skills including structural equation modeling, hierarchical linear modeling, and meta-analysis, using Mplus, AMOS, HLM, and R. During her doctoral training, she published seven manuscripts in prestigious journals including Psychological Assessment, Developmental Psychology, and Journal of Adolescence. She has also served as an ad hoc reviewer for journals such as Journal of Youth and Adolescence and PlosOne.

Email address: dan.liu@med.fsu.edu

 

Liyan Yu profile photoDr. Liyan Yu is a postdoctoral scholar in the Department of Behavioral Sciences and Social Medicine at the College of Medicine, Florida State University. She obtained her doctoral degree from the Psychology Department of The Education University of Hong Kong (2020-2023). Her research primarily focuses on various factors impacting reading comprehension, including family processes (e.g., family SES, parenting), family investment (e.g., home literacy environment, number of children's books), social-emotional skills, cognitive-linguistic skills (e.g., working memory, non-verbal intelligence, vocabulary knowledge, and syntactic awareness), and word reading. Recently, she has been conducting research on ADHD symptoms and visual motor skills in children with Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1).

Dr. Yu is proficient in data analysis, particularly in the areas of meta-analysis and structural equation modeling (including mediation, moderation, cross-lagged panel, and latent growth curve models) using Mplus and R. During her doctoral training, she has published manuscripts in journals such as Reading and Writing, Education Sciences, and Frontiers in Psychology. Additionally, she serves as a reviewer for journals like Frontiers in Human Neuroscience.

Email address: Liyan.Yu@med.fsu.edu

 

Xiaoli Zong profile photoDr. Xiaoli Zong is a postdoctoral scholar in the Department of Behavioral Sciences and Social Medicine in the College of Medicine at Florida State University. She completed her doctoral training at the Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, Baltimore County (2017 - 2023). Her research focuses on the socio-cultural (e.g., culture, socio-economic status) and contextual (e.g., discrimination) influences on parenting (e.g., parenting style, parental socialization) and their subsequent impact on children’s socioemotional (e.g., anxiety, depressive symptoms), behavioral (e.g., civic engagement), and academic (e.g., achievement goals) development, particularly among marginalized and minoritized families. Her recent research focuses on the cognitive development of children with Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1).

Dr. Zong is proficient at quantitative analytical skills including structural equation modeling, time-varying effect modeling, latent profile analysis using Mplus, R, and SAS, as well as observational coding skills using Mangold INTERACT. She has published several manuscripts in journals such as Developmental Psychology, Journal of Youth and Adolescence, and Journal of Research on Adolescence.

Email address: Xiaoli.Zong@med.fsu.edu

 

 

Research Assistants

 

Julia MoreiraJulia Moreira is a sophomore in the Interdisciplinary Medical Science (IMS): Clinical Professions major within the FSU College of Medicine. Her career goals include attending medical school following undergraduate graduation, pursuing a residency and fellowship program in her specialty of choice, and eventually opening up a private practice. To combine her interests in writing, research, and medicine she hopes to work with a news network in the future as medical reporter/writer. 

 

 

 

Benjamin Mujica profile picture

Benjamin Mujica is a Senior in the IMS Clinical Professions major at FSU. His goals include going to medical school in Texas, and providing care to people in need with an emphasis on Hispanic populations.  

 

 

 

 

Mary-Mac Chown profile pictureMary-Mac Chown is a junior majoring in Clinical Professions under the Interdisciplinary Medical Sciences Degree Program at Florida State University. Following graduation, she plans to pursue a career in healthcare by attending medical school. She has nurtured her interest in medical research through her work experiences, including authoring an abstract as a 2022 Mayo Clinic Clinical Research Internship Study Program intern. The paper “Intracranial Motion during Frameless Stereotactic Radiosurgery” has been selected for presentation at the 2023 Radiosurgery Society Scientific Meeting. She is furthering her research efforts by joining the DEaR Lab research team to learn about meta-analysis and aid in the effort to understand the effects the environment has on child and adolescent development.  

 

Joel Killam profile pictureJoel Killam is a junior majoring in Psychology, with a minor in Child Development at Florida State University (FSU). After graduating, he hopes to obtain a master's degree in clinical health counseling from the College of Education at FSU. His career goal is to open his own practice as a therapist, specializing in children's therapy.

 

 

 

Elora MukhopadhyayElora Mukhopadhyay is a senior pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Medical Sciences (IMS): Clinical Professions Major, and a psychology focus at Florida State University. Her career goals include attending medical school to become a surgeon and eventually starting her own practice. Elora is passionate about being involved in her community and making healthcare accessible to underserved and minority populations. 

 

 

Angelena Novotney profile pictureAngelena Novotney is a freshman pursuing a bachelor’s degree in Biology as well as a bachelor’s degree in Philosophy within the Florida State University College of Arts and Sciences. Her career goals include attending medical school to study Ophthalmology with a retinal specialty and opening her own private practice. She is currently on track to be Phlebotomy, EMR, and CCMA certified as well as an active member of her community by volunteering abroad to help provide healthcare to those in need.  

 

 

 

Lauren Morey profile pictureLauren Morey is a junior majoring in Clinical Professions under the Interdisciplinary Medical Sciences Program at Florida State University’s College of Medicine. Following graduation, she has aspirations to attend medical school to become a Dermatologist and eventually open up her own private practice. She is currently BLS, CPR, and CMA-certified, having worked in local practices to expand her medical knowledge.  

 

 

 

Janelle Bunni

 

Janelle Bunni is a sophomore majoring in Exercise Physiology. She expects to graduate in Spring 2026 and plans to attend either Medical or Optometry school.

 

 

 

Olivia FetterOlivia Fetter is majoring in Biology with a minor in Chemistry. After graduating in 2025, she plans on continuing her education with medical school with the hopes of being a doctor specializing in women’s hormones.

 

 

 

 

Luke Spoto

Luke Spoto is a Junior at FSU majoring in Clinical Professions under the Interdisciplinary Medical Sciences Degree Program (IMS). Following graduation in Spring 2025, he hopes to attend medical school and pursue a residency in internal medicine.

 

 

 

 

 

Than Zin Oo Hlaing

Than Zin Oo Hlaing is a junior majoring in Biology with a minor in Psychology. She plans to graduate in the spring semester of 2025, and attend medical school, in hopes of pursuing a career in anesthesiology or sports medicine.

 

 

 

 

Anabelle ShelhornAnabelle Shelhorn is a sophomore Pre-Medical student working to achieve her Bachelor's of Science in Psychology. Following her graduation in Spring of 2026, she plans to continue her education attending medical school and pursue a career in adolescent psychiatry. Anabelle is currently a certified medical assistant and appreciates her time in the laboratory in which she can apply her research knowledge to her workplace.

 

 

 

Hannah IroffHannah Iroff is a junior majoring in biology with a minor in chemistry. Following her graduation in the spring of 2025, she plans to further her interest in medicine by attending medical school, in which she will become a dermatologist and eventually, open a private practice.

 

 

 

Myat Myat Noe

Myat Myat Noe is a junior majoring in Psychology with a minor in Chemistry. After graduating in the spring of 2025, she plans to attend medical school and pursue a career in psychiatry.

 

 

 

 

Adriana Aguilera

Adriana Aguilera is a senior majoring in Psychology with a minor in Criminology. After graduating in the Fall 2024, she plans to continue her studies by attending graduate school and specializing in Clinical Psychology with Forensic applications.

 

 

Collaborators


UCLA Logo

Carrie Bearden, Ph.D. 
Professor; Director, Center for the Assessment and Prevention of Prodromal States 
Department of Psychology 
University of California - Los Angeles 

Website

 

University of Texas at Austin Logo

Aprile D. Benner, Ph.D. 
Professor 
Department of Human Development and Family Sciences 
The University of Texas at Austin 

Website 

 

University of Manchester Logo

Shruti Garg, Ph.D.
Clinical Senior Lecturer
Division of Psychology & Mental Health
The University of Manchester

Website 

 

The Hebrew Universiity of Jerusalem Logo

Yafit Gilboa, Ph.D. 
Senior Lecturer 
School of Occupational Therapy  
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem 

Website 

 

University of Colorado Logo

Jennifer Janusz, Psy.D. 
Program Director, Neurofibromatosis Program 
University of Colorado 

Website 

 

University of Kentucky Logo

Sihui (Echo) Ke, Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor  
Modern & Classical Languages, Literatures & Cultures  
University of Kentucky 

Website 

 

University of Texas at Austin Logo

Su Yeong Kim, Ph.D. 
Professor 
Department of Human Development and Family Sciences 
The University of Texas at Austin 

Website  

 

University of Wisconsin-Milawaukee Logo

Bonita Klein-Tasman, Ph.D. 
Professor of Psychology, Graduate School Associate Dean 
College of Letters & Science 
University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee 

Website 

 

Kennedy Krieger Institute Logo

Stepanie M. Morris, M.D. 
Medical Director, Center for Autism and Related Disorders (CARD) 
Kennedy Krieger Institute 

Website 

 

Murdoch Children's Research Institute Logo

Jonathan M. Payne, Ph.D. 
Co-Group Leader/Principal Research Fellow, Muscle Research Group 
Murdoch Children's Research Institute 

Website  

Children's Hospital at Westmead Logo

Natalie Pride, Ph.D. 
Clinical Neuropsychologist, Kids Neuroscience Centre 
Children's Hospital at Westmead 

Website 

 

MD Anderson Cancer Center Logo

Peter L. Stavinoha, Ph.D. 
Professor 
Department of Pediatrics Patient Care 
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center 

Website  

University of Hong Kong Logo

Xiuhong Tong, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor 
Department of Psychology,
The Education University of Hong Kong

Website 

 

Children's National Hospital Logo

Karin S. Walsh, Psy.D. 
Co-Director, Pre-Doctoral Externship Training Program, Pediatric Neuropsychology  
Children's National Hospital 

Website 

 

NCI Logo

 

Pamela L. Wolters, Ph.D.  
Director, Health Psychology and Neurobehavioral Research 
Pediatric Oncology Branch  
National Cancer Institute   

Website 

 

Research


Neurobehavioral development in individuals with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1)

NF1 is a genetic disease affecting approximately 1 in 2,700 people globally. Individuals with NF1 often develop various tumors and exhibit more neurobehavioral problems (e.g., cognitive deficits and learning difficulties) than the general population. Our research aims to comprehensively understand neurobehavioral development (i.e., cognitive, academic, socio-emotional, and behavioral development) in individuals with NF1 by applying innovative methodologies. Knowledge from this line of work will be critical for guiding future patient management and informing future intervention studies and policies related to the NF1 population. Below are descriptions of ongoing projects.

Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses on Neurobehavioral Function of Individuals with NF1:

  • We are conducting a systematic literature review and meta-analytic study to synthesize prior findings on neurobehavioral functions of individuals with NF1 and analyze how findings depend on sample and study characteristics. Specifically, we are working on multiple papers on 1) ADHD symptoms, 2) internalizing and externalizing problems, 3) academic achievement, 4) perpetual motor skills, and 5) the effectiveness of treatments and interventions on neurobehavioral function.

Integrative Data Analysis on Neurobehavioral Function of Children and Adolescents with NF1:

  • We are using integrative data analysis to combine multiple neuropsychological datasets of children with NF1 (ages 2-18). We will use innovative statistical approaches (e.g., time-varying effect modeling, latent profile analysis) to analyze the combined dataset to provide much-needed information, including 1) neurobehavioral trajectories across age, 2) phenotypic subpopulations with various neurobehavioral profiles, and 3) predictors of neurobehavioral functions. This project is funded by the USA Department of Defense (DOD) Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs, Neurofibromatosis Research Program (NFRP, 2021-2025).

    Ecological Momentary Assessment of Daily Neurobehavioral Function in Adolescents with NF1:

    • Most NF1 neurobehavioral research has focused on comparing individuals with and without NF1 and assessed neurobehavioral function at one time using traditional psychological measures in the clinic or lab. We know little about how neurobehavioral function varies across contextual factors in the daily lives and natural living environments of individuals with NF1. This critical knowledge gap impedes the development of interventions to improve the neurobehavioral function of individuals with NF1. The proposed study will address this critical gap by examining how psychosocial factors (e.g., parenting, social support, coping strategies) and lifestyle factors (physical activity, sleep) are related to neurobehavioral (cognitive, behavioral, emotional) function in the daily lives of adolescents with NF1. The project team will collect rich data on neurobehavioral function and its potential predictors from adolescents with NF1 (ages 13-19 years) in real-time and real-world environments using ecological momentary assessment and Fitbit activity trackers. Multilevel modeling will be used to analyze the data. Findings from the study will be critical for patient management and developing interventions to improve neurobehavioral function and overall quality of life among adolescents with NF1. This project is funded by FSU Seed grant (2024-2026). It will provide essential pilot data for two external grant applications to investigate further predictors and long-term consequences of NF1 adolescents’ neurobehavioral function.

    Cognitive Aging in Middle-Aged and Older Adults with NF1:

    • This project aims to delineate the cognitive profile and cognitive aging patterns and identify predictors of cognitive function among middle-aged and older adults (MOA) with NF1. We will collect survey and interview data on cognitive function and potential between-person predictors among 500 MOA with NF1, a population that is incredibly understudied and underserved. We have little empirical evidence on how cognitive functions change with age and what factors predict cognitive aging among MOA with NF1. The project will address this critical gap to provide much-needed information for patient management and intervention development, including a) the cognitive profile and age differences in cognitive function among MOA with NF1; b) which subgroups of patients with certain NF1-related disease factors are at greater risk for cognitive problems among MOA; and c) how psychosocial factors (e.g., psychological wellbeing, social integration, personality) predict cognitive aging among MOA with NF1. Such knowledge will help MOA with NF1, their families, and care providers to develop more realistic expectations about cognitive aging and inform what psychosocial factors may be promising intervention targets to improve cognitive health. This project is funded by the Children’s Tumor Foundation Clinical Research Award (CRA, 2024-2026).

     

    Informant discrepancies in reports of family processes and child mental health

    A common and challenging methodological issue in clinical and developmental studies is that different family members often report discordant information on the same study construct. My research sheds light on this issue by examining the patterns, antecedents, and consequences of parent-adolescent discordance in their reports of family processes and child mental health. This line of research highlights that parent-adolescent discordance in reports of family processes has substantive meaning and significant implications for adolescent development. The findings have broad implications for social and clinical science methodology concerning how to interpret and handle informant discordance.

    This line of research is not our lab's primary focus currently, but Dr. Hou continues to collaborate with others on this and is happy to work with mentees interested in this research topic.

     

    Environmental factors affecting child/adolescent health

    Our research examines how contextual stressors (e.g., discrimination), teachers, parents, and peers jointly influence child/adolescent mental health. For example, we identified multiple strengths of families and adolescents that moderate the association between contextual stressors and adolescent mental health (e.g., depression, anxiety, delinquency), such as positive parenting, racial socialization, parent-child relationships, and psychological resilience. We also identified various mediating processes linking contextual stressors and child/adolescent mental health. This line of work will inform policymakers and practitioners on the malleable factors to promote optimal child development in the face of adverse stressors.

    Dr. Hou is developing new proposals integrating this line and the first line of work and is happy to work with mentees interested in this research.

    Publications


    Neurobehavioral development in children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1)

    Peer-reviewed journal articles:

    1. Hou, Y., Wu, X., Allen, T., Toledo-Tamula, M. A., Martin, S., Baldwin, A., Gillespie, A., Goodwin, A., Widemann B. C. ,  & Wolters, P. L. (2023) Longitudinal association between executive function and academic achievement in children with neurofibromatosis type 1 and plexiform neurofibromas. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Societydoi:10.1017/S1355617723000103
    2. Hou, Y., Wu, X., Liu, D., Martin, S., Toledo-Tamula, M. A., Allen, T., Baldwin, A., Gillespie, A., Goodwin, A., Widemann B. C. , & Wolters, P. L. (2022) Demographic and Disease-Related Predictors of Socioemotional Development in Children with Neurofibromatosis Type 1 and Plexiform Neurofibromas: An Exploratory Study. Cancers. Advance online publication. doi: 10.3390/cancers14235956. https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6694/14/23/5956
    3. Hou, Y., Allen, T., Wolters, P. L., Toledo-Tamula, M. A., Martin, S., Baldwin, A., Reda, S., Gillespie, A., Goodwin, A. & Widemann B. C. (2020) Predictors of cognitive development in children with neurofibromatosis type 1 and plexiform neurofibromas. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, 62, 977-984. doi:10.1111/dmcn.14489.

    Informant discrepancies in reports of family processes and child mental health

    Peer-reviewed journal articles:

    1. Chen, S., Jelsma, E., Hou,Y., Benner, A.D, and Kim, S.Y. (2021) Antecedents and consequences of discrepant perceptions of racial socialization between parents and adolescents within Mexican-origin families. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 50, 2412–2426. doi: 10.1007/s10964-021-01487-z.
    2. Hou, Y., Benner, A.D., Kim, S. Y., Chen, S., Spitz, S., Shi, Y., & Beretvas, T. (2020) Discordance in parents’ and adolescents’ reports of parenting: A meta-analysis and qualitative review. American Psychologist, 75, 329-348. doi: 10.1037/amp0000463.
    3. Hou, Y., Kim, S. Y., & Benner, A.D. (2018). Parent-adolescent discrepancies in reports of parenting and adolescent outcomes in Mexican American immigrant families. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 47, 430-444. doi: 10.1007/s10964-017-0717-1.

     

    Environmental factors affecting child/adolescent health

    Parental ethnic minority-related experiences, family processes, and adolescent outcomes

    Peer-reviewed journal articles:

    1. Zhang, M., Kim, S. Y., Hou, Y., & Shen, Y. (2020) Parent-adolescent acculturation profiles and adolescent language brokering experiences in Mexican immigrant families. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 49, 335–351. doi: 10.1007/s10964-019-01064-5.
    2. Varner, F., Hou, Y., Ross, L., Hurd, N., & Mattis, J. S. (2019) Dealing with discrimination: Parents’ and adolescents’ racial discrimination experiences and parenting in African American families. Cultural Diversity & Ethnic Minority Psychology. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1037/cdp0000281.
    3. Kim, S. Y., Chen, S., Hou, Y.*, Zeiders, K., & Calzada, E. (2019) Mexican American parental socialization profiles: Considering cultural socialization and general parenting practices. Cultural Diversity & Ethnic Minority Psychology, 25, 439–450. doi: 10.1037/cdp0000234.
    4. Juang, L., Hou, Y., Douglass, S, & Kim, S. Y. (2018). Time-varying effects of family conflict and youth adjustment among Chinese American families. Developmental Psychology, 54, 938-949. doi: 10.1037/dev0000475.
    5. Hou, Y., Neff, L. & Kim, S. Y. (2018). Language acculturation, acculturation-related stress, and marital quality in Chinese American couples. Journal of Marriage and Family, 80, 555-568. doi: 10.1111/jomf.12447.
    6. Hou, Y., Kim, S. Y., Hazen, N. L. & Benner, A. D. (2017). Parents’ perceived discrimination and adolescent adjustment in Chinese American families: Mediating family processes. Child Development, 88, 317-331. doi: 10.1111/cdev.12603.
    7. Hou, Y., Kim, S. Y., & Wang, Y. (2016). Parental acculturative stressors and adolescent adjustment through interparental and parent-child relationships in Chinese American families. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 45, 1466-1481. doi: 10.1007/s10964-016-0441-2.
    8. Kim, S. Y., & Hou, Y. (2016). Intergenerational transmission of cultural orientations in Chinese American families: The role of bicultural socialization. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 45, 1452-1465. doi: 10.1007/s10964-016-0423-4.
    9. Kim, S. Y., Wang, Y., Shen, Y., & Hou, Y. (2015). Stability and change in adjustment profiles among Chinese American adolescents: The role of parenting. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 44, 1735-1751. doi: 10.1007/s10964-015-0303-3.
    10. Kim, S. Y., Wang, Y., Chen, Q., Shen, Y., & Hou, Y. (2015). Parent-child acculturation profiles as predictors of Chinese American adolescents' academic trajectories. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 44, 1263-1274. doi: 10.1007/s10964-014-0131-x.

     

    Book chapters:

    1. Kim, S. Y., Zhang, M., Hou, Y. & Shen, Y. (2020) Acculturation, parent-child relationships, and mental health of adolescents in Chinese and Mexican immigrant families. In G. C. Nagayama Hall (Ed.), Immigration and mental health (pp. 25-44). New York: Elsevier.
    2. Hou, Y. & Kim, S. Y. (2018). Acculturation-related stressors and individual adjustment in Asian American families. In S. S. Chuang & C.L. Costigan (Eds.), Parental roles and relationships in immigrant families: An international approach (pp. 131-145). New York, NY: Springer Science + Business Media.
    3. Kim, S. Y., Chen, S., Sim, L., & Hou, Y. (2017). Stability and change in parenting and adjustment profiles across early, middle, and late adolescence in Chinese American families. In Y. Choi & H. C Hahm (Eds.), Asian American parenting: Family process and intervention (pp. 69-88). New York, NY: Springer International Publishing. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-63136-3_4

     

    Adolescents’ ethnic minority-related experiences and consequences for their well-being

    Peer-reviewed journal articles:

    1. Kim, S. Y., Chen, S., Wen, W., Yan, J., Song., J., Hou, Y., Zhang, M., Schwartz, S. J., & Shen, Y. (2021). Language brokering-stress transition profiles and marijuana use in Mexican-origin adolescents. Journal of Psychoactive Drugs. 53, 384-393. doi: 10.1080/02791072.2021.1992046.
    2. Kim, S. Y., Zhang, M., Chen, S., Song, J., Lopez, B. G., Rodriguez, E. M., Calzada, E., Hou, Y., Yan, J., & Shen, Y. (2020) Bilingual language broker profiles and academic competence in Mexican-origin adolescents. Developmental Psychology, 56, 1582–1595. doi: 10.1037/dev0001010.
    3. Chen, S., Hou, Y., Benner, A.D. & Kim, S. Y. (2020) Discrimination, language brokering efficacy, and academic competence among adolescent language brokers. Journal of Adolescence, 79, 247-257. doi:10.1016/j.adolescence.2020.01.015.
    4. Juang, L., Shen, Y., Costigan, C., & Hou, Y. (2018) Time-varying associations of racial discrimination and adjustment among Chinese-heritage adolescents in the US and Canada. Development and Psychopathology, 30, 1661-1678. doi: 10.1017/S0954579418001128.
    5. Kim, S. Y., Hou, Y., Song, J., Schwartz, S. J., Chen, S., Zhang, M., Perreira, K. M., & Parra-Medina, D. (2018). Profiles of language brokering experiences and contextual stressors: Implications for adolescent outcomes in Mexican immigrant families. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 48, 1629-1648. doi: 10.1007/s10964-018-0851-4.
    6. Varner, F., Hou, Y., Hodzic, T., Hurd, N., Butler-Barnes, S., & Rowley, S. (2018). Racial discrimination experiences and Black youth adjustment: The role of parenting profiles based on racial socialization and involved-vigilant parenting. Cultural Diversity & Ethnic Minority Psychology, 24, 173-186. doi: 10.1037/cdp0000180.
    7. Kim, S. Y., Hou, Y., & Gonzalez, Y. (2017). Language brokering and depressive symptoms in Mexican American adolescents: Parent-child alienation and resilience as moderators. Child Development, 88, 867-881. doi: 10.1111/cdev.12620.
    8. Kim, S. Y., Hou, Y., Shen, Y., & Zhang, M. (2017). Longitudinal measurement equivalence of the language brokering scale for Mexican American adolescents. Cultural Diversity & Ethnic Minority Psychology. 23, 230-243. doi: 10.1037/cdp0000117.
    9. Hou, Y., Kim, S. Y., Wang, Y., Shen, Y., & Orozco-Lapray, D. (2015). Longitudinal relationships between discrimination and ethnic affect or depressive symptoms among Chinese American adolescents. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 44, 2110-2121. doi:10.1007/s10964-015-0300-6.
    10. Kim, S. Y., Shen, Y., Hou, Y., Tilton, K., Juang, L. P., & Wang, Y. (2015). Annual review of Asian American psychology 2014. Asian American Journal of Psychology, 6, 291-332. doi:10.1037/aap0000031.

     

    Book chapters:

    1. Hou, Y. & Kim, S. Y. (2016). Language brokering. In R. J. R. Levesque (Ed.), Encyclopedia of adolescence (pp. 1-8). New York, NY: Springer. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-32132-5_234-2

     

    The influence of peer relationship on adolescent adjustment

    Peer-reviewed journal articles:

    1. Wu, N., Hou, Y. , Zeng Q., Cai, H. & You, J. (2021) Bullying experiences and nonsuicidal self-injury among Chinese adolescents: a longitudinal moderated mediation model. Journal of Youth and Adolescence. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1007/s10964-020-01380-1.
    2. Benner, A.D., Hou, Y., & Jackson, K. (2020) The consequences of friend-related stress across early adolescence. Journal of Early Adolescence, 40, 249–272. doi: 10.1177/0272431619833489.
    3. Wu, N., Hou, Y., Chen, P. & You, J. (2019) Peer acceptance and nonsuicidal self-injury among Chinese adolescents: A longitudinal moderated mediation model. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 48, 1806-1817. doi: 10.1007/s10964-019-01093-0.
    4. Jiang, Y., You, J., Hou, Y., Du, C., Lin, M-P., Zheng, X., & Ma, C. (2016). Buffering the effects of peer victimization on adolescent nonsuicidal self-injury: The role of self-compassion and family cohesion. Journal of Adolescence, 53, 107-115. doi:10.1016/j.adolescence.2016.09.005.

     

    Others

    Peer-reviewed journal articles:

    1. Benner, A.D., Fernandez, C. +, Hou, Y., & Smith, C. (2021) Parent and teacher educational expectations and adolescents’ academic performance: Mechanisms of influence. Journal of Community Psychology, 49, 2679-2703. doi:10.1002/jcop.22644.
    2. Wu, N., Hou, Y., Yu, C., & Wang, Q. (2018). Intergeneration transmission of educational aspiration in Chinese families: Identifying mediators and moderators. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 47. 1238-1251. doi: 10.1007/s10964-018-0820-y.

    Resources


    Looking for postdocs!

    We are looking for postdocs to join our DEaR lab. There are two open positions. Please click the link below for more detailed description of the positions:

    Postdoc Position in Cognitive Aging.docx (FSU career job ID 56724)

    Postdoc Positions_Biopsychosocial Factors in Health Outcomes Across the Lifespan.docx (FSU career job ID 57030)

     

    Start Date: Flexible start date.

    Appointment Length: Can be renewed annually based on performance and funding availability.

    Compensation: Competitive salary and benefits depending on qualifications.

    Deadline to Apply: Applications are reviewed on a rolling basis until the positions are filled. Apply as soon as possible!

     

    Other postdoc opportunities:

    Dr. Hou would also be happy to serve as a mentor for postdocs funded by other sources. Below are some potential sources you may be eligible to apply:

     

    Directed Individual Study Opportunities

    Graduate and undergraduate students interested in gaining research experience are welcome to email Dr. Hou (yang.hou@med.fsu.edu) to discuss potential opportunities to participate in our lab’s projects.

    Current research projects focus on cognitive, academic, socio-emotional, and behavioral development in individuals with neurofibromatosis type 1 and evaluate interventions/treatments targeting these outcomes.

    Responsibilities in the lab may include:

    • Literature search
    • Review and coding papers for meta-analysis
    • Cleaning and analyzing data

    Requirements:

    • Minimum GPA - 3.5
    • Available for at least 9 hours per week (3 credits)

     

    Introduction


    We apply a wide range of statistical methods in research, including but not limited to:

    ·        Research Synthesis Methods

    o   Meta-analysis

    o   Integrative data analysis

    ·        Longitudinal data analyses

    o   Time-varying effect modeling

    o   Growth modeling

    o   Cross-lagged panel model

    ·        Mediation and moderation analyses

    o   Actor partner interdependence model

    o   Moderated mediation model

    ·        Person-centered analyses to identify subpopulations

    o   Latent class/profile analysis

    o   Growth mixture analysis

    For each method, we are familiar with the following applications. If you want to discuss any of these with someone, you are welcome to contact Dr. Hou.

    ·        When to use it (e.g., research questions it can address, its data requirements)?

    ·        How to do it (e.g., available software and sample syntax)?

    ·        How to report and interpret the results?

    Below we provide sample lab publications using each approach and resources to learn more about each method. We also included some resources for power analysis and clinical trial design.

    Resources


    Meta-Analysis

    Sample publication:

    Hou, Y., Benner, A.D., Kim, S. Y., Chen, S., Spitz, S., Shi, Y., & Beretvas, T. (2020) Discordance in parents’ and adolescents’ reports of parenting: A meta-analysis and qualitative review. American Psychologist, 75, 329-348. doi: 10.1037/amp0000463.

    Resources:

    A step by step guide for conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis with simulation data

    The PRISMA 2020 statement: an updated guideline for reporting systematic reviews

    Doing Meta-Analysis in R: A Hands-on Guide

    Integrative Data Analysis

    Sample publication:

    Juang, L., Hou, Y., Douglass, S, & Kim, S. Y. (2018). Time-varying effects of family conflict and youth adjustment among Chinese American families. Developmental Psychology, 54, 938-949. doi: 10.1037/dev0000475.

    Juang, L., Shen, Y., Costigan, C., & Hou, Y. (2018) Time-varying associations of racial discrimination and adjustment among Chinese-heritage adolescents in the US and Canada. Development and Psychopathology, 30, 1661-1678. doi: 10.1017/S0954579418001128.

    Resources:

    Integrative data analysis: The simultaneous analysis of multiple data sets

    Maelstrom Research guidelines for rigorous retrospective data harmonization

    Time-Varying Effect Modeling

    Sample publication:

    Juang, L., Hou, Y., Douglass, S, & Kim, S. Y. (2018). Time-varying effects of family conflict and youth adjustment among Chinese American families. Developmental Psychology, 54, 938-949. doi: 10.1037/dev0000475.

    Juang, L., Shen, Y., Costigan, C., & Hou, Y. (2018) Time-varying associations of racial discrimination and adjustment among Chinese-heritage adolescents in the US and Canada. Development and Psychopathology, 30, 1661-1678. doi: 10.1017/S0954579418001128.

    Resources:

    Time-varying effect modeling lab at PennState University

    Growth Modeling

    Sample publication:

    Hou, Y., Allen, T., Wolters, P. L., Toledo-Tamula, M. A., Martin, S., Baldwin, A., Reda, S. +, Gillespie, A., Goodwin, A. & Widemann B. C. (2020) Predictors of cognitive development in children with neurofibromatosis type 1 and plexiform neurofibromas. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, 62, 977-984. doi:10.1111/dmcn.14489.

    Resources:

    Twelve Frequently Asked Questions About Growth Curve Modeling

    Growth Modeling: Structural Equation and Multilevel Modeling Approaches

    Cross-Lagged Panel Model

    Sample publication:

    Hou, Y.*, Kim, S. Y., & Wang, Y. (2016). Parental acculturative stressors and adolescent adjustment through interparental and parent-child relationships in Chinese American families. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 45, 1466-1481. doi: 10.1007/s10964-016-0441-2.

    Resources:

    Autoregressive and cross-lagged panel analysis for longitudinal data

    A critique of the cross-lagged panel model

     

    Actor Partner Interdependence Model

    Sample publication:

    Hou, Y.*, Neff, L. & Kim, S. Y. (2018). Language acculturation, acculturation-related stress, and marital quality in Chinese American couples. Journal of Marriage and Family, 80, 555-568. doi: 10.1111/jomf.12447.

    Hou, Y.*, Kim, S. Y., Hazen, N. L. & Benner, A. D. (2017). Parents’ perceived discrimination and adolescent adjustment in Chinese American families: Mediating family processes. Child Development, 88, 317-331. doi: 10.1111/cdev.12603.

    Resources:

    Assessing Mediation in Dyadic Data Using the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model

    The Actor–Partner Interdependence Model: A model of bidirectional effects in developmental studies

    Moderated Mediation Model

    Sample publication:

    Wu, N., Hou, Y. *, Zeng Q., Cai, H. & You, J. (2021) Bullying experiences and nonsuicidal self-injury among Chinese adolescents: a longitudinal moderated mediation model. Journal of Youth and Adolescence. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1007/s10964-020-01380-1.

    Wu, N., Hou, Y., Chen, P. & You, J. (2019) Peer acceptance and nonsuicidal self-injury among Chinese adolescents: A longitudinal moderated mediation model. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 48, 1806-1817. doi: 10.1007/s10964-019-01093-0.

    Resources:

    Addressing Moderated Mediation Hypotheses: Theory, Methods, and Prescriptions

    Latent Class/Profile Analysis

    Sample publication:

    Hou, Y., Kim, S. Y., & Benner, A.D. (2018). Parent-adolescent discrepancies in reports of parenting and adolescent outcomes in Mexican American immigrant families. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 47, 430-444. doi: 10.1007/s10964-017-0717-1.

    Kim, S. Y., Hou, Y., Song, J., Schwartz, S. J., Chen, S., Zhang, M., Perreira, K. M., & Parra-Medina, D. (2018). Profiles of language brokering experiences and contextual stressors: Implications for adolescent outcomes in Mexican immigrant families. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 48, 1629-1648. doi: 10.1007/s10964-018-0851-4.

    Resources:

    Latent Class Analysis and Latent Profile Analysis

    Statistical Power to Detect the Correct Number of Classes in Latent Profile Analysis

    Growth Mixture Analysis

    Sample publication:

    Benner, A.D., Hou, Y., & Jackson, K. (2020) The consequences of friend-related stress across early adolescence. Journal of Early Adolescence, 40, 249–272. doi: 10.1177/0272431619833489.

    Resources:

    An Introduction to Latent Class Growth Analysis and Growth Mixture Modeling

    Power Analysis

    Resources:

    Power Analysis and Sample Size, When and Why?

    Introduction to Power Analysis - Statistical Consulting - UCLA

    Clinical Trial Design

    Resources:

    Clinical Trial Designs

    Challenges in the design, conduct, analysis, and reporting in randomized clinical trial studies: A systematic review