FSU Medical Alumni Hall of Fame Class of 2021

The College of Medicine welcomed its six-member Hall of Fame Class of 2021 on Friday, Aug. 6. The new inductees were first recognized during the White Coat Ceremony at Rudy Diamond Concert Hall before retreating to the Heritage Museum in Dodd Hall for a dinner and formal presentation.

You can click on their names below to learn more about the 2021 Hall of Fame Class.

Tanya Anim, M.D.

Tanya Anim, M.D., College of Medicine Class of 2010

Assistant professor - FSU College of Medicine Family Medicine Residency Program at Lee Health, Fort Myers

The thing I appreciate the most about my FSU medical education:
“What I appreciate most about my education was the focus on primary care and serving the underserved. I really identified with the mission of the College of Medicine and was so glad to be accepted. The experiences I had in my third and fourth year of medical school prepared me for a career in family medicine and caring for those in most need. I worked directly with so many community preceptors who saw patients with complex medical and social issues and each physician was dedicated to providing excellent care and role modeled for me what being a physician really means.”

The thing I am most proud of in my health care career:
“Serving on the ACGME (Accreditation Council for Graduation Medical Education) Family Medicine Milestones committee is what I have been most proud of to date. I was happy to serve our specialty and help to create the milestones, thereby contributing to resident education and the future of our specialty as a whole.”

The thing I like best about being a physician:
“I am so proud to be a family physician! I have been afforded the opportunity to practice full spectrum family medicine as well as teach. I love the variety of the patients and conditions that I am able to see and take care of. I especially love caring for patients, delivering their babies, and continuing to care for them and third children long term. I also enjoy being an advocate for, not only patients, but for other physicians through organized medicine.”
 

Fawn Harrison, M.D.

Fawn Harrison, M.D., College of Medicine Class of 2005

Pediatrician, Oak Street Primary Clinic

Pediatrics clerkship director – FSU College of Medicine Sarasota Regional Campus

The thing I appreciate the most about my FSU medical education:
“I always appreciated the faculty and locations in which I learned in medical school. However, looking back and comparing my experiences at the Florida State College of Medicine to that of a traditional medical school curriculum, my experiences were much broader…than they would have been elsewhere. Even before medical school I knew I loved the rural lifestyle, but I had no idea what that would mean for practicing medicine. FSUCOM allowed me to learn from the best faculty, both in urban areas and in rural areas. I was fully prepared to seek further training in any field of medicine and with any future practice goal.”

The things I am most proud of in my health care career:
“I am most proud to be a friend and resource to patients and families in need. Establishing those relationships allow the successes of medicine.”

The thing I like best about being a physician:
“I have told each of my medical students that you must find the thing in medicine that makes you smile. For me this is opening the exam room door and finding a new little patient to get to know, or a little friend to catch up with.”
 

Rudy Hehn, M.D.

Rudy Hehn, M.D., PIMS 1978

Family physician, Archbold Memorial Hospital, Thomasville, Georgia

The thing I appreciate the most about my FSU medical education:
“The thing I appreciate most about my FSU/PIMS medical education is that I did not just learn a bunch of facts. I learned how to be a physician. I learned how to listen to my patients, how to think like a doctor, and how to keep learning for the first of my life.”

The things I am most proud of in my health care career:
“The thing I am most proud of in my career is adapting to change without compromising my core beliefs.  Diagnostic imaging and disease management are dramatically different than when I graduated from PIMS in 1978. For example, desktop computers and MRIs did not exist.  The medications and technology I use now may be new, but I still value a gentle touch and a compassionate ear.”
 

Peter Katona, M.D.

Peter Katona, M.D., PIMS 1974

Clinical professor of medicine, infectious diseases, UCLA Schools of Medicine and Public Health

The thing I appreciate the most about my FSU medical education:
“The diversity of people, how well medicine was taught, and a great campus.”

The things I am most proud of in my health care career:
“Being able to mix clinical medicine, where I help one person at a time, with public health, where I’m trying to help the masses.”

An FSU College of Medicine – or PIMS – faculty member who was influential to me, and why:
“Paul Elliot. He met with me, liked me, saw promise in me, and gave me the opportunity to become a doctor.”
 

Jimmy Moss, M.D.

Jimmy Moss, M.D., College of Medicine Class of 2010

Anesthesia Critical Care, Washington University/Barnes-Jewish Hospital, St. Louis, Mo.

The thing I appreciate the most about my FSU medical education:
“Everything.”

The things I am most proud of in my health care career:
“Becoming a better patient advocate each and every day I walk into the hospital. I fully appreciate my role as a leader in my field, however, each patient encounter is an opportunity for me to act as a liaison between the diseases my patients are burdened with and their path towards betterment. As a team member, I enjoy that my fellow teammates trust me with their efforts, their energy, and their expectations as we aim to practice exceptional care.”

An FSU College of Medicine faculty member who was influential to me (and why):
“Dr. Jacqueline Lloyd. During my geriatrics rotation, she outlined the importance of understanding a patient’s journey through the medical system and managing their ailments. I took her conversations to heart and still use many of her bedside manner techniques when interviewing and examining my patients.”

If I could go back now and give advice to myself as a first-year med student, it would be:
“Start paying your loans now, because that interest never fades. But in all seriousness, the biggest advice would be to implement more balance into my life. Medical school and residency/fellowship are filled with so many tasks and assignments, and clinical expectations that it becomes relatively easy to become imbalanced, with your personal life taking the shorter end of the stick. I would tell my younger self: ‘Don’t just smell the roses. Enjoy the garden.’”

The thing I like best about being a physician:
“I’m an intensivist, so I am often dealt with the task of helping bridge the gap between life and death; offering patients a chance to die with dignity and respect. I enjoy that part the most; saving lives as well as ensuring, at the end of life, patients are given the opportunity to approach death with respect and honor.”
 

Stephen Patrick, M.D.

Stephen Patrick, M.D., College of Medicine Class of 2007

Director, Center for Child Health Policy

Associate professor of pediatric & health policy, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine

The thing I appreciate the most about my FSU medical education:
“The thing I most appreciate about my time at FSU was the community, support and mentorship I received. FSU allowed me to explore my passions in medicine, public health and health policy. It was an extraordinarily supportive environment where we were empowered to create organizations, initiatives, and explore leadership opportunities. Because of the size of our class and community campus, there was an extraordinary sense of community coupled with individual time with mentors. Support from faculty like Bob Brooks, Daniel Van Durme and David O’Bryan helped to form the physician that I am today.”