Chapman Community Health Program (CCHP)

CCHP Community Garden
Chapman at Maryland Oaks

The Chapman Community Health Program (CCHP) is a partnership between the FSU College of Medicine and Maryland Oaks Crossing, a low-income housing community. CCHP serves as an opportunity for students to actively engage in the overall mission of the FSU College of Medicine – to serve medically underserved populations and to respond to community needs. Currently, student leaders at the FSU College of Medicine plan and execute health screenings, promote preventative health education initiatives, and foster community development. Past successes include implementation of monthly health screenings, smoking cessation workshops, a community garden and food pantry, and regular social activities. CCHP projects are continuously evolving to meet the needs of the dynamic community at Maryland Oaks Crossing.

Foundation of the Chapman Society

The Florida State University College of Medicine Chapman Society is a Chapter of the Gold Humanism Honor Society. The Arnold P. Gold Foundation, a public foundation dedicated to fostering humanism in medicine, sponsors chapters of The Gold Humanism Society.

Student and faculty members are selected by our Gold Humanism committee with the founding members being selected in 20 -20 Our Gold Society had its first formal meeting on (??? April 2, 2003), at which time the founding members were inducted into the Society.


Dr. Jules B. Chapman
Our Chapman Humanism chapter is named after Dr. Jules B. Chapman and Mrs. Annie Lou Chapman.

Dr. Chapman was born and raised in Florida. He completed his undergraduate studies at the University of Florida, where he participated as a member of the UF Marching Band. Upon graduation in 1932, Dr. Chapman initially pursued graduate training at the American Conservatory of Music in Chicago. He then matriculated at the University of Tennessee School of Medicine and received his M.D. degree in 1939.

Dr. Chapman completed his internship at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami. During that exciting year, he married Annie Lou Boozer. After his internship, Dr. Chapman served five years as a regimental surgeon in the European theatre. After War II, Dr. Chapman continued residency training at the Episcopal Eye, Ear & Throat Hospital in Washington, D.C. He subsequently returned to Florida and began private practice in Ophthalmology in West Palm Beach.

Dr. Chapman was recalled to active duty at the onset of the Korean War in 1950 and became a flight surgeon. He held many key leadership positions in the military, including a three-year tour of duty in French Morocco as a hospital commander. Dr. Chapman retired from active duty in 1965 with the rank of Colonel.
After his retirement from military service, Dr. and Mrs. Chapman moved to Ft. Myers, Florida, where he became an active participant in community affairs. He was a prominent member of the Royal Palm Yacht Club and the Ft. Myers Power Squadron, and taught advanced piloting for many years. He was also a loyal and devout member of the Unitarian Universalist Church.

In his personal and professional life, Dr. Jules B. Chapman demonstrated remarkable compassion and humanism. Throughout his life he remained a most humble and caring person. In recognition of his exemplary professional service, the University of Florida College of Medicine Chapter of the Gold Humanism Honor Society is named in his honor.

Mrs. Annie Lou Chapman was born in Haines City and was a longtime resident of Fort Myers. During WW II, Mrs. Chapman was a nurse in Miami at Jackson Memorial Hospital where she worked alongside Dr. Bascom Palmer in the pioneering days of cataract surgery. In the late 1930’s Mrs. Chapman served as the private nurse to Governor Henry Horner of Illinois. Mrs. Chapman’s husband, Jules B. Chapman, M.D. (Chappy), passed in 1991.

Mrs. Chapman will best be remembered for her unique and dedicated philanthropy. For most of the last two decades, Mrs. Chapman devoted her efforts to humanism in medicine in order to promote care and understanding in the doctor-patient relationship. To that end, Mrs. Chapman funded several full medical school scholarships at the University of Florida, and created the Chapman Chapter of the Gold Humanism Society, in memory of Dr. Jules B. Chapman. The Florida State University Chapman Chapter is named in honor of Dr. and Mrs. Chapman and supported by The Jules B. Chapman M.D. and Annie Lou Chapman Foundation. The Chapman Humanism Society selects and honors senior medical students, residents and faculty members who exemplify the highest standards of humane patient care.

Mrs. Chapman’s birthday was April 23rd. If still alive she would have been 100 years old. She died on February 13, 2013, an hour before Valentine’s Day. In 2010 she was quoted in the Gainesville Sun saying, “I could spend every day going to a funeral if I wanted, but on the whole, I prefer to enjoy each day of my life.” Mrs. Chapman’s urn was placed with Dr. Chapman without fanfare or ceremony. She was a truly remarkable person who lived a remarkable life.

 

Purpose and Function

The Chapman Chapter of the Gold Humanism Honor Society (GHHS), known locally as simply the Chapman Society, was established at the Florida State University College of Medicine during 2013. Since the founding of our Gold Humanism Society Chapter we have been part of a national effort to provide a means of formally recognizing medical students, residents and faculty members demonstrating exemplary behavior that promotes humanism in medicine. Creation of this GHHS Chapter serves to emphasize the importance of humanism and professionalism throughout the continuum of physician training at our medical school.

The GHHS is a national organization that honors senior medical students, residents, role-model physician teachers and other exemplars recognized for demonstrated excellence in clinical care, leadership, compassion and dedication to service. Organized to elevate the values of humanism and professionalism within the field of medicine and its constituent institutions, the Society is fast becoming integrated into the medical educational environment.

The Florida State University College of Medicine Chapman Chapter of the Gold Humanism Honor Society shall:

• sponsor academic events emphasizing humanism in medicine;
• promote humanism in medicine through various other activities;
• undertake community projects; and
• assist the Dean in fulfilling the mission, goals and objectives of the College.

Members of the Chapman Chapter of the Gold Humanism Honor Society should demonstrate:

• integrity and sound moral reasoning;
• respect for others from all stations of life;
• a willingness to engage in supportive patient interaction/advocacy;
• the ability to establish communicative relationships that focus on listening and understanding;
• an ability to learn from life experiences; and
• in the face of adversity, maintain compassion, concern, respect, integrity and commitment to humanistic goals.

Health Screenings: 
The Chapman Community Health Program is designed to have one health screening every other month. Screenings will include vital signs, body mass index, vision and hearing tests, and blood glucose. We have a partnernip with TMH residents to provide a brief, individual consultation for community members following the screening. Each year, free flu shots are also provided by the TMH residency program for the members of Maryland Oaks Crossing.

Health Education Services: 
Health education services for residents and their children will be offered. Educational workshops will include topics such as nutrition, dental hygiene, tobacco cessation, prevention of common illnesses, safe sex, and maternity care.

Referral and Transportation to Neighborhood Medical Center: The Chapman Program is working with
Neighborhood Medical Center, a local federally qualified health center. Should a screening prompt a referral for advanced care, residents of the community will be connected with this health center and also be provided with transportation to this facility if needed.

Tutoring Services:
Chapman works with Nole -Med, an undergraduate organization at Florida State University, to provide tutoring for the children at Maryland Oaks on a weekly basis.

Monthly Free Community Choice Food Market:
Chapman partners up with America's Second Harvest of the Big Bend to provide free non-perishable pantry items each month for the community members of Maryland Oaks, as well as for it's sister community, Mission Oaks.

Work with Grace Mission:
Members of the Chapman Community Health Program work with Grace Mission to provide assistance with health screenings for the homeless population of Tallahassee.

 

 

To be announced

Research within Chapman is a new endeavor with a long term goal of providing a comprehensive analysis on the effects of the organization’s interventions and engagements within local underserved communities. Our focus is to gather insight on our participation with underserved communities, provide an outlet for widespread communication with other medical school community outreach programs, and give students within CCHP another unique opportunity to grow as future physicians.

Currently, CCHP is working on a nutritional project involving the Maryland Oaks Community. After partnering with Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare (TMH) nutritionists, we want to assess the nutritional knowledge and life style changes before and after a intervention with the nutritionists and their community focused grocery tours.

In addition to the nutritional study, CCHP is also working on a project exploring Florida State University’s healthcare students perspective on underserved communities at the beginning and end of their medical education. CCHP has a special interest in seeing what effect CCHP involvement has on a student’s career path. In other words, does participation in CCHP make a future healthcare provider more likely to pursue a career in primary care medicine?